Winter Workouts: Sprinting Towards the Season

By Elizabeth Smith
Thinking of doing a sport this winter but not sure how to prepare? Don’t worry; detailed below are recommended workouts by winter sport coaches. Other winter sport options include bowling, boys’ swimming, girls’ cheerleading, and girls’ gymnastics. Tryouts begin Nov. 14.

"Ideally, the best thing to do to prepare for track is to run cross country: the long distance running sets a base for your leg muscles, making them stronger and therefore less likely to get injured. Playing another sport that has a lot of running, like soccer, would also be ideal. However, there is no “magic bullet” workout. What works for you may not work for your friend—the key to preparing isn’t what you do but rather putting in consistent effort every day. As far as diets go, the best thing to do is to have a healthy, all-around diet. Having a little bit of everything is always better than a crash diet or protein shakes." -Track Coach Damon Reader

"If you are really interested in getting a feel for the team before the official season begins, there is optional off-season practice once a week at 6:30 AM in the East Gym. Other ways to prepare include full body and muscle group workouts. Wrestling involves a lot of stretching, and the biggest muscle groups associated with that are the legs and back, so good exercises to try are squats, deadlifts, and pull-ups. Do sprint intervals to prepare for the bursts of energy you need in wrestling. As far as diets go, the best thing to do would be cut out processed foods and eat foods as close to their natural state as possible. Dieting is not recommended for wrestling because the focus is on being strong and feeling good, not on being light." -Wrestling Coach Peter Marques

"Training for fencing needs to be very sport-specific. Fencing involves a lot of muscle memory, so repetition of footwork and agility is vital to success. Explosive activity and very quick movements are also  good ways to prepare. Because of the quick movements involved in fencing, you don’t want to feel sluggish, bloated, or weighed down by the foods you eat. Therefore, eating a good, clean diet with no greasy or heavy foods is important." -Fencing Coach Josh Baravarian 

"While there is no single particular workout to keep in mind, it is important to play basketball year-round. Spring and fall off-season leagues are good options because they keep you in shape and keep up your skills. Aside from basketball, it would be good to participate in other cardiovascular activities like soccer, running, or even biking. It is important to go to the weight room as much as possible to build up muscle. Since basketball involves a lot of cardio exercise, players are generally already in shape and don’t need to follow a specific diet." -Basketball Coaches Thomas Umstatter & Bradley Krauz

Photos reproduced by permission of Great Neck South High School

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